Gil-galad REDUX

(My unsactioned completion of J.R.R. Tolkien’s short, three verse version in the Lord of the Rings.)

Gil-galad was an elven-king.

Of him the harpers sadly sing;

the last whose realm was fair and free

between the Mountains and the Sea.

His sword was long, his lance was keen.

His shining helm afar was seen;

the countless stars of heaven’s field

were mirrored in his silver shield.

But long ago he rode away,

and where he dwelleth none can say;

for into darkness fell his star

in Mordor where the shadows are.

The King of Men Elendil came

tall he was with sword of flame.

Honest, brave, and righteous he

a Numenorean from the sea.

Alliance made in Middle-earth

a chance for men to show their worth,

countless thousands clad in armor bright

with swords and arrows wrought to fight.

The Elves and Men they fought so brave

against the orc, the Dark Lord’s slave.

For seven years Elendil and Gil-galad

trapped their cunning foe within his land.

Until the day when Sauron’s wrath

brought him to the plain of Gorgoroth.

Brave Gil-galad he rode to meet him there

And challenged his foe, for he had no fear.

His flashing steel, his flowing mail

withstood the Dark Lord’s evil flail.

Aeglos his spear did inflict wounds upon

The still living flesh of black Sauron.

Elendil with rage and fury, flew

to aid his elvish ally drew

his sword Narsil, The Sun and Moon,

and upon the Dark Lord, he did hewn.

But shining Gil-galad, his body burned

by the evil hands that he had spurned,

in battle now a falling star in flaming, great.

A spirit in the Halls of Mandos now to wait.

So fell Elendil too, his Narsil broken.

To Elendil’s son, it was more than token

a blade still sharp, the enemy at his feet;

Sauron, less one finger, suffered his defeat.

Gil-galad was an elven-king.

Of him the harpers sadly sing;

the last whose realm was fair and free

between the Mountains and the Sea.

For within the dreams of men and elves

in memory long where no shadow delves

he still stands mighty, tall, and fair

and the wind blows through his flaxen hair.

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